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Point Pleasant
(732) 965-3100

January 2022

Tuesday, 25 January 2022 00:00

The Importance of Treating Foot Wounds

When the outer layers of the skin on the feet are damaged and expose deeper tissues, it is known as a foot wound or ulcer. These wounds can occur from issues such as wearing shoes that don’t fit correctly, as well as an injury or trauma to the feet. If these wounds are left untreated, they may become infected which could lead to other issues including amputation. Common indicators of an infection include inflammation, redness, an odor, or thickened tissues. Patients who are at a higher risk for foot wounds (such as diabetics, who may have trouble feeling the wounds) or who notice that their foot wound is not healing, should have the wound looked at by a podiatrist. Upon examination, a podiatrist will likely remove the unhealthy skin and then help determine the best treatment method for the particular wound, including shoe padding, antibiotics, or even surgery.

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with Dr. Alan J. Spector from Shore Podiatry. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a non-diabetic. 

What Is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Point Pleasant, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Wound Care
Wednesday, 19 January 2022 00:00

Gout Pain Can Be Managed

Gout is a painful, inflammatory form of arthritis. Those affected will typically feel an intense stiffness in the joints of their feet, particularly in the big toe. Schedule a visit to learn about how gout can be managed and treated.

Tuesday, 18 January 2022 00:00

Self-Care for Heel Spurs

Heel spurs are bony bumps that can form on the underside of your heel bone. They are usually painless, but can become painful if the tissue around the heel swells. Pain typically worsens with activity. There are several things that you can do at home to address heel spur pain. First, you should rest your injured foot so that it can heal. Keep weight and pressure off the affected foot if possible, and apply ice to the injury to reduce swelling. Stretch your legs and feet before getting out of bed to loosen the muscles and tendons in your feet. Wearing properly fitting shoes or orthotic inserts can also help to cushion and support your feet, and you may wish to also take over-the-counter medications to reduce pain. If your heel pain doesn’t improve or worsens, it is strongly suggested that you seek the care of a podiatrist for a proper examination.

Heel spurs can be incredibly painful and sometimes may make you unable to participate in physical activities. To get medical care for your heel spurs, contact Dr. Alan J. Spector from Shore Podiatry. Our doctor will do everything possible to treat your condition.

Heels Spurs

Heel spurs are formed by calcium deposits on the back of the foot where the heel is. This can also be caused by small fragments of bone breaking off one section of the foot, attaching onto the back of the foot. Heel spurs can also be bone growth on the back of the foot and may grow in the direction of the arch of the foot.

Older individuals usually suffer from heel spurs and pain sometimes intensifies with age. One of the main condition's spurs are related to is plantar fasciitis.

Pain

The pain associated with spurs is often because of weight placed on the feet. When someone is walking, their entire weight is concentrated on the feet. Bone spurs then have the tendency to affect other bones and tissues around the foot. As the pain continues, the feet will become tender and sensitive over time.

Treatments

There are many ways to treat heel spurs. If one is suffering from heel spurs in conjunction with pain, there are several methods for healing. Medication, surgery, and herbal care are some options.

If you have any questions feel free to contact our office located in Point Pleasant, NJ . We offer the latest in diagnostic and treatment technology to meet your needs.

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Tuesday, 11 January 2022 00:00

What Is Medial Tibial Stress Syndrome?

Medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS), more commonly known as shin splints, is an injury to the shin bone that occurs due to excess pressure being placed on it during physical activity. Shin splints are characterized by pain, tenderness, or soreness on the inside of the lower leg bone, particularly during exercise. Shin splints are typically treated through conservative methods. You may be encouraged to rest the injured leg, taking pressure off of it and giving it time to heal. Applying ice to the affected leg and taking over-the-counter medications can help reduce pain. Doing strengthening and stretching exercises may also help. To prevent shin splints, you should make sure that your shoes fit well and are supportive. When exercising, increase the length and intensity of your workouts slowly over time to avoid placing too much stress on the shin bones. For more information about shin splints, please consult with a podiatrist. 

Ankle and foot injuries are common among athletes and in many sports. They can be caused by several problems and may be potentially serious. If you are feeling pain or think you were injured in a sporting event or when exercising, consult with Dr. Alan J. Spector from Shore Podiatry. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Common Injuries

The most common injuries that occur in sporting activities include:

  • Achilles Tendonitis
  • Achilles Tendon Rupture
  • Ankle Sprains
  • Broken Foot
  • Plantar Fasciitis
  • Stress Fractures
  • Turf Toe

Symptoms

Symptoms vary depending upon the injury and in some cases, there may be no symptoms at all. However, in most cases, some form of symptom is experienced. Pain, aching, burning, bruising, tenderness, tightness or stiffness, sensation loss, difficulty moving, and swelling are the most common symptoms.

Treatment

Just as symptoms vary depending upon the injury, so do treatment options. A common treatment method is known as the RICE method. This method involves rest, applying ice, compression and elevating the afflicted foot or ankle. If the injury appears to be more serious, surgery might be required, such as arthroscopic or reconstructive surgery. Lastly, rehabilitation or therapy might be needed to gain full functionality in the afflicted area. Any discomfort experienced by an athlete must be evaluated by a licensed, reputable medical professional.  

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Point Pleasant, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Sports Related Foot and Ankle Injuries
Tuesday, 04 January 2022 00:00

Why Do My Heels Hurt?

If you are middle-aged, overweight, pregnant, stand for long periods of time, or wear shoes that offer little cushioning, you may be a candidate for plantar fasciitis. Other causes include, having flat feet, wearing ill-fitting shoes, running or jumping on hard surfaces, and having medical conditions, such as diabetes and arthritis. The plantar fascia is a band of tissue that connects the toes with the heels. When the plantar fascia is overstretched or bruised, the heel often bears the brunt of the pain. The pain is usually worse when you first get up in the morning, or after sitting or standing for long periods of time. There are a number of home remedies, such as icing the painful area, massaging your foot by rolling a golf ball under it, losing weight, and wearing heel pads in your shoes. However, if pain continues to increase, it may be wise to seek the opinion of a podiatrist who can examine the area, properly diagnose the condition, and suggest specific treatment options. 

Plantar fasciitis is a common foot condition that is often caused by a strain injury. If you are experiencing heel pain or symptoms of plantar fasciitis, contact Dr. Alan J. Spector from Shore Podiatry. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is Plantar Fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis is one of the most common causes of heel pain. The plantar fascia is a ligament that connects your heel to the front of your foot. When this ligament becomes inflamed, plantar fasciitis is the result. If you have plantar fasciitis you will have a stabbing pain that usually occurs with your first steps in the morning. As the day progresses and you walk around more, this pain will start to disappear, but it will return after long periods of standing or sitting.

What Causes Plantar Fasciitis?

  • Excessive running
  • Having high arches in your feet
  • Other foot issues such as flat feet
  • Pregnancy (due to the sudden weight gain)
  • Being on your feet very often

There are some risk factors that may make you more likely to develop plantar fasciitis compared to others. The condition most commonly affects adults between the ages of 40 and 60. It also tends to affect people who are obese because the extra pounds result in extra stress being placed on the plantar fascia.

Prevention

  • Take good care of your feet – Wear shoes that have good arch support and heel cushioning.
  • Maintain a healthy weight
  • If you are a runner, alternate running with other sports that won’t cause heel pain

There are a variety of treatment options available for plantar fasciitis along with the pain that accompanies it. Additionally, physical therapy is a very important component in the treatment process. It is important that you meet with your podiatrist to determine which treatment option is best for you.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Point Pleasant, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

Read more about Plantar Fasciitis
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